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Posts tagged ‘programming’

3
Apr

How and Why to Implement Keyboard Shortcuts in iOS 7

Support for keyboard shortcuts is new in iOS 7. The new UIKeyCommand class and the -[UIResponder keyCommands] method allow app developers to add keyboard shortcuts to their iOS apps without using ugly hacks.

Two Reasons

There are two reasons to add keyboard shortcuts to your iOS app:

  1. People often use wireless keyboads with their iPads, especially for text entry. Keyboard shortcuts for an external keyboard are helpful additions that can make typing on an iOS device more convenient.
  2. They work in the iOS Simulator! During development and testing, keyboard shortcuts are so much nicer than using the mouse to simulate gestures on the simulator.

I admit that second reason is a benefit only during development. However, keyboard shortcuts make using the simulator so much nicer that, ten minutes after adding them to my app, I was kicking myself for not adding them sooner.

Key Commands

The first thing to do is to implement the keyCommands method in one of your classes in the responder chain. On iOS, the responder chain includes the currently focused control, its super views, and their associated view controllers.

@implementation MyViewController

- (NSArray *)keyCommands {
    return @[
        [UIKeyCommand keyCommandWithInput:@"f" modifierFlags:0 action:@selector(keyPressF)]
    ];
}

@end

Starting at the first responder and working up the responder chain, iOS will ask each object if it responds to the given action. The first object it finds that implements the method is allowed to handle the key press. This means that you can implement the keyCommands method in a different class than you define the action handler methods. However, to avoid compiler warnings about private methods, it’s often easier to do both in the same class.

The keyCommands method appears to be called three times for each key press, so you may want to cache the array if you have a lot commands.

First Responders

By default, iOS will only generate key press events when a control, such as a text field, is the first responder. You can fix that by overriding the canBecomeFirstResponder method in your root view controller so that it can become the first responder. You can implement the keyCommands method and your action methods there too.

@implementation MyRootViewController

- (BOOL)canBecomeFirstResponder {
    return YES;
}

- (NSArray *)keyCommands {
    return @[
        [UIKeyCommand keyCommandWithInput:@"f" modifierFlags:0 action:@selector(keyPressF)]
    ];
}

- (void)keyPressF {
    // Do something awesome here.
}

@end

This lets you avoid having to create and manage a hidden text field or something similar.

Handling Dialogs

For simple apps, that’s all you need to do. However, if your app presents a modal dialog with a text field, then your root view controller will not regain first responder status when that dialog is dismissed.

You could manually tell your root view controller to become the first responder each time a dialog is dismissed. But there is an easier way.

UIApplication is the top-level object in the responder chain. If you subclass UIApplication and override the canBecomeFirstResponder method, then it will become the first responder when a dialog is dismissed. Then it will tell your root view controller to become the first responder again.

@implementation MyApplication

- (BOOL)canBecomeFirstResponder {
    return YES;
}

@end

To tell iOS to use your new UIApplication subclass, you need to modify the main method in main.m:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        // The third parameter is nil by default.
        return UIApplicationMain(argc, argv, NSStringFromClass([MyApplication class], NSStringFromClass([AppDelegate class]));
    }
}

Now a dialog with a text field will no longer mess up your keyboard shortcuts.

Simplifying Things

Things are working, but you can simplify a bit more if you want. Instead of having an app delegate separate from your UIApplication subclass, you can let your subclass be its own delegate.

Then you can move everything from your app delegate into your new MyApplication class, including the properties and app lifecycle methods, and delete your app delegate class.

@interface MyApplication : UIApplication <UIApplicationDelegate>

@property (strong, nonatomic) UIWindow *window;

@end

Then adjust main.m one more time to assign the same class as both the application and its delegate:

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        NSString *app = NSStringFromClass([MyApplication class]);
        return UIApplicationMain(argc, argv, app, app);
    }
}

Let me know if I’ve missed something or there are better ways to do this. :)

Future Hopes

As of iOS 7, the UIApplicationDelegate is in the responder chain, and I think it would be better to do this stuff there than subclassing UIApplication. But right now the UIApplicationDelegate does not appear to forward first responder status to the root view controller. So this only works with a UIApplication subclass.

4
Sep

My Current Project

A few months ago, two friends asked if I’d be interested in working on a book project with them. Jed is a successful artist and illustrator. Noelle is a brilliant writer and educational designer. They’ve worked together on several projects and wanted a programmer to help design a book app. I said yes before they stopped talking. :)

Here is one of Jed’s early designs:

Story app mock up

It’s an interactive fiction fantasy story app, except that the plot is cohesive and targeted at a young adult audience. In many choosable path books, the endings were often very different from each other. For example, the plot might change from bank robbers to aliens depending on which door you went through. Also you died a lot.

In our story app, you nudge the main character in the direction you want her to go even as the story unfolds around her. The book remembers the choices you make and adjusts the text and artwork as you go along. Noelle is writing the same story more than 20 times and loving it. She’s been planning this story since high school.

A website is coming soon. We’re close to finishing the programming, art and writing for chapter one. Noelle is wrapping up chapter two in a few weeks.

Jed recently completed a successful Kickstarter project for traditional hand-made Japanese woodblock prints of video game characters. It’s kinda cool, so check it out if you’re interested.

3
Aug

3 Tips on Auto Synthesized Properties

Ha ha! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders, the most famous of which is “never get involved in a land war in Asia.” But only slightly less well-known is this: “Never have an auto-synthesized property and an instance variable with the same name when death is on the line!”

—Vizzini

At work, my team decided to drop support for iOS 4. Most of our customers have upgraded to iOS 5.1. Surprisingly, very few are still using iOS 5.0. I guess over-the-air upgrades are working really well for people.

Our app is old. In some places we still checked if the user had upgraded to iOS 3 yet. :) My team spent the week on cleanup and paying down technical debt. My job was to:

  1. Convert to using object literals for arrays, dictionaries and numbers.
  2. Remove @synthesize calls.
  3. Switch all of our instance variables to properties.

I love shortening and removing code without losing functionality. The first two tasks went fairly quickly. But I…uh…learned a lot while tackling number three.

You can declare an instance variable in an @interface block — either the public interface in the .h file or the private interface in the .m file. You can also declare one in the @implementation block in the .m file. Or all three at once.

You can mix instance variables, properties and auto-synthesized properties. But auto-synthesized properties are so much nicer: less code, less maintenance, less boilerplate typing. Here are 3 tips to help you use properties more effectively.

1. Deal With Read-Only Properties

An auto-synthesized property generates an instance variable with the same name as the property except prefixed with an underscore. This is great because it’s clear whether you’re using the property (self.myprop) or the instance variable (_myprop). Using the bare name (myprop) doesn’t even compile, so you limit the confusion and bugs caused by accidental mistypes.

Auto-synthesized properties create their own getter and setter methods (avoiding some unnecessary typing). You can implement your own getter and/or setter, in which case those methods are not automatically generated. The instance variable (_myprop) is still synthesized.

However, if your property is readonly AND you implement your own getter method, then an instance variable is not synthesized. I suspect this is to allow for a named property that is dynamically calculated. In any case, if you would like an instance variable, you can force it to be synthesized by either:

  1. Using @synthesize myprop = _myprop; in your @implementation, or
  2. Redeclaring the property as readwrite in your private @interface

The second option works like inheritance in that you can redeclare a property as less-restrictive but not the other way. Redeclaring a public readwrite property as privately readonly isn’t possible, though why you’d want to do that remains a mystery.

2. Avoid Instance Variables

It is a Bad Thing™ to have both an auto-synthesized property and an instance variable declared with the same name.

  1. self.myprop = 1 uses the auto-synthesized instance variable
  2. myprop = 1 uses the declared instance variable
  3. _myprop = 1 uses the auto-synthesized instance variable

Since you end up with two instance variables, when you probably intended to have only one, doing this can cause lots of unexpected bugs and problems. Better to avoid declaring instance variables for your synthesized properties.

It is a Worse Thing™ to have two auto-synthesized properties of the same name with one prefixed with an underscore.

    @property myprop;
    @property _myprop;

This causes problems because self._myprop is different than _myprop when you really should have used __myprop, making you start to wonder about your own sanity. This doesn’t seem like it would happen much, but it can if you are importing several .h files, one of which uses underscores in its property names.

So don’t do that. :)

3. Use Instance Variables Correctly

In most cases, it’s best to stick with using the property (self.myprop) in your code. However, it’s important to use the instance variable (_myprop) in two cases:

  1. In your init: methods to avoid possible side-effects if you implement your own setter later, and
  2. In your custom getter and setter methods to avoid infinite recursion (always nice).

Auto-synthesized properties are great. Not quite as awesome as ARC, but close.

21
Oct

How to Launch a Privileged Process on OS X

For security reasons, Apple recommends that GUI applications should never run with the privileges of the root user. GUI applications normally load several types of plugins and input managers automatically. If a malicious plugin was installed then it could cause security problems when the privileged application was launched.

In addition, system services that run with the privileges of the root user (such as launch daemons) need to avoid using certain technology frameworks provided by Apple. These frameworks are not safe to use in a service that runs with the privileges of the root user.

If you need your GUI application to do something that requires root privileges, Apple recommends you split your application into two parts. First, create a GUI that runs as a normal user. Then when you need to do something with root privileges, you launch a separate helper process or tool. Splitting your application avoids security holes while keeping things very easy for your users.

Two Steps

Launching a privileged process is done in two steps:

1) Request authorization. The operating system will ask the user for permission to run a privileged process. The user will need to enter an administrator’s username and password.

#import <Security/Security.h>

OSStatus PreauthorizePrivilegedProcess(AuthorizationRef *authRef) {
    AuthorizationItem item = { kAuthorizationRightExecute, 0, NULL, 0 };
    AuthorizationRights rights = { 1, &item };
    AuthorizationFlags flags = kAuthorizationFlagInteractionAllowed | kAuthorizationFlagExtendRights | kAuthorizationFlagPreAuthorize;
    return AuthorizationCreate(&rights, kAuthorizationEmptyEnvironment, flags, authRef);
}

2) Launch the process. If the user authenticates correctly, you can use the authorization reference created above to launch the helper process.

OSStatus LaunchPreauthorizedProcess(AuthorizationRef *authRef, NSString *path) {
    OSStatus status = AuthorizationExecuteWithPrivileges(*authRef, [path UTF8String], kAuthorizationFlagDefaults, NULL, NULL);
    AuthorizationFree(*authRef, kAuthorizationFlagDestroyRights);
    return status;
}

Please note that the authorization reference created in the first function is released in the second function. If you want to launch several privileged processes in a short amount of time, you can comment out this line and and release the reference on your own afterwards.

Some of Apple’s sample code (and other examples) has an extra step where they copy the authorization reference. This is only necessary if you have a previously created authorization reference that you want to add elevated privileges to.

Just One Step

If you don’t need to update your GUI between these two steps, then both actions can be combined into one step.

#import <Security/Security.h>

OSStatus LaunchPrivilegedProcess(NSString *path) {
    AuthorizationRef authRef;
    OSStatus status = AuthorizationCreate(NULL, kAuthorizationEmptyEnvironment, kAuthorizationFlagDefaults, &authRef);
    if (status == errAuthorizationSuccess) {
        status = AuthorizationExecuteWithPrivileges(authRef, [path UTF8String], kAuthorizationFlagDefaults, NULL, NULL);
        AuthorizationFree(authRef, kAuthorizationFlagDestroyRights);
    }
    return status;
}

I consider this code to be in the public domain. Please feel free to copy and paste. And let me know if you find any problems or have suggestions.

28
Jun

How to Check the System Idle Time Using Cocoa

UPDATE: Aleksandar Sabo wrote a brief explanation of how this code works.

There is sample code on the Internet for programmatically checking the system idle time using IOKit and Cocoa (see here, for example). However, most of the examples seem overly long (see Paul Graham’s Succinctness is Power). The code below works in Tiger/10.4 and later and is about as concise as I can make it while still handling errors properly.

#include <IOKit/IOKitLib.h>

/**
 Returns the number of seconds the machine has been idle or -1 if an error occurs.
 The code is compatible with Tiger/10.4 and later (but not iOS).
 */
int64_t SystemIdleTime(void) {
    int64_t idlesecs = -1;
    io_iterator_t iter = 0;
    if (IOServiceGetMatchingServices(kIOMasterPortDefault, IOServiceMatching("IOHIDSystem"), &iter) == KERN_SUCCESS) {
        io_registry_entry_t entry = IOIteratorNext(iter);
        if (entry) {
            CFMutableDictionaryRef dict = NULL;
            if (IORegistryEntryCreateCFProperties(entry, &dict, kCFAllocatorDefault, 0) == KERN_SUCCESS) {
                CFNumberRef obj = CFDictionaryGetValue(dict, CFSTR("HIDIdleTime"));
                if (obj) {
                    int64_t nanoseconds = 0;
                    if (CFNumberGetValue(obj, kCFNumberSInt64Type, &nanoseconds)) {
                        idlesecs = (nanoseconds >> 30); // Divide by 10^9 to convert from nanoseconds to seconds.
                    }
                }
                CFRelease(dict);
            }
            IOObjectRelease(entry);
        }
        IOObjectRelease(iter);
    }
    return idlesecs;
}    

I consider this code to be in the public domain. Please feel free to copy and paste. And let me know if you find any problems or have suggestions.

18
May

How to Print a PDF File Using Cocoa

UPDATE 2014-03-13: @robwithhair created a command-line tool for printing PDF files based on this code which shows some additional options.

Mac OS X is well known for its great support for PDF files. You can create a PDF file from anything you can print. I thought that using Apple’s PDFKit framework would make it easy to program a way to print an existing PDF file. That turned out not to be the case.

Sending a file to a printer using the lp command is easy. However, this approach does not work for PDF files formatted for landscape printing. You can specify landscape orientation, but I wanted a way to detect the orientation automatically.

PDFKit has a PDFView object that has a printWithInfo:autoRotate: method. However, adding a PDFDocument to a PDFView and telling it to print doesn’t work. I eventually stumbled onto the fact that PDFDocumenthas a secret method that makes printing easy. So here is the code:

#import <Quartz/Quartz.h>

- (void)printPDF:(NSURL *)fileURL {

    // Create the print settings.
    NSPrintInfo *printInfo = [NSPrintInfo sharedPrintInfo];
    [printInfo setTopMargin:0.0];
    [printInfo setBottomMargin:0.0];
    [printInfo setLeftMargin:0.0];
    [printInfo setRightMargin:0.0];
    [printInfo setHorizontalPagination:NSFitPagination];
    [printInfo setVerticalPagination:NSFitPagination];

    // Create the document reference.
    PDFDocument *pdfDocument = [[[PDFDocument alloc] initWithURL:fileURL] autorelease];

    // Invoke private method.
    // NOTE: Use NSInvocation because one argument is a BOOL type. Alternately, you could declare the method in a category and just call it.
    BOOL autoRotate = YES;
    NSMethodSignature *signature = [PDFDocument instanceMethodSignatureForSelector:@selector(getPrintOperationForPrintInfo:autoRotate:)];
    NSInvocation *invocation = [NSInvocation invocationWithMethodSignature:signature];
    [invocation setSelector:@selector(getPrintOperationForPrintInfo:autoRotate:)];
    [invocation setArgument:&printInfo atIndex:2];
    [invocation setArgument:&autoRotate atIndex:3];
    [invocation invokeWithTarget:pdfDocument];

    // Grab the returned print operation.
    NSPrintOperation *op = nil;
    [invocation getReturnValue:&op];

    // Run the print operation without showing any dialogs.
    [op setShowsPrintPanel:NO];
    [op setShowsProgressPanel:NO];
    [op runOperation];
}

I consider this code to be in the public domain. Please feel free to copy and paste. And let me know if you find any problems or have suggestions.

27
Aug

How to Create an Alias Programmatically

First, a disclaimer. Apple will warn you not to do this. The only supported way of creating an alias is to use the Finder. If you must do it programmatically, you will be told to use AppleScript. But if AppleScript won’t work for you, and a simple Cocoa method is what you want, read on.

Mozy’s Mac client doesn’t create aliases, but our customers do. We want to make sure our software backs them up correctly. So we added some unit tests to our build process that create aliases and check to see that Mozy handles them correctly.

We first used AppleScript, but ran quickly into two issues:

  1. Our build server runs as the root user, which doesn’t have a UI context. AppleScript doesn’t work without a UI context.

  2. Even running as a normal user, AppleScript cannot access the system temporary files location (/tmp) which is where we wanted to create our aliases.

That’s when the fun began.

I spent quite a bit of time failing to find the right bit of magic to create an alias that functioned properly in Finder. It turns out that an alias is a data structure inside another data structure stored in the resource fork of an empty file. Those structures need to have the correct record types for everything to work.

Having gone to the trouble of figuring this out, I thought I’d share. This code creates an alias for a folder, but it should serve as a good template if you need to create another type.

- (void)makeAliasToFolder:(NSString *)destFolder inFolder:(NSString *)parentFolder withName:(NSString *)name
{
    // Create a resource file for the alias.
    FSRef parentRef;
    CFURLGetFSRef((CFURLRef)[NSURL fileURLWithPath:parentFolder], &parentRef);
    HFSUniStr255 aliasName;
    FSGetHFSUniStrFromString((CFStringRef)name, &aliasName);
    FSRef aliasRef;
    FSCreateResFile(&parentRef, aliasName.length, aliasName.unicode, 0, NULL, &aliasRef, NULL);

    // Construct alias data to write to resource fork.
    FSRef targetRef;
    CFURLGetFSRef((CFURLRef)[NSURL fileURLWithPath:destFolder], &targetRef);
    AliasHandle aliasHandle = NULL;
    FSNewAlias(NULL, &targetRef, &aliasHandle);

    // Add the alias data to the resource fork and close it.
    ResFileRefNum fileReference = FSOpenResFile(&aliasRef, fsRdWrPerm);
    UseResFile(fileReference);
    AddResource((Handle)aliasHandle, 'alis', 0, NULL);
    CloseResFile(fileReference);

    // Update finder info.
    FSCatalogInfo catalogInfo;
    FSGetCatalogInfo(&aliasRef, kFSCatInfoFinderInfo, &catalogInfo, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    FileInfo *theFileInfo = (FileInfo*)(&catalogInfo.finderInfo);
    theFileInfo->finderFlags |= kIsAlias; // Set the alias bit.
    theFileInfo->finderFlags &= ~kHasBeenInited; // Clear the inited bit to tell Finder to recheck the file.
    theFileInfo->fileType = kContainerFolderAliasType;
    FSSetCatalogInfo(&aliasRef, kFSCatInfoFinderInfo, &catalogInfo);
}

I consider this code to be in the public domain. Please feel free to copy and paste. And let me know if you find any problems or have suggestions.

If you need a complete solution, Nathan Day wrote a nice set of classes called NDAlias. We didn’t want to import 9 classes for just a handful of unit tests.

I later found some of Apple’s sample code from 1999 demonstrating a similar approach. I think our Objective-C example is much easier to use.